To Smoke or Not To Smoke…That is the Question?

 

Marijuana dispensaries selection of different cannabis. / V. Richard Haro/Coloradoan library

Marijuana is extremely prevalent in today’s American society. Whether it is the media doing a story on the pros and cons on marijuana, to it being used on a more individualized/recreational basis, marijuana has made its mark on modern culture. But the biggest question that lawmakers and individuals alike contemplate, is whether or not the substance should be legalized. Although the federal government is strongly against the legalization of the drug, more and more states are starting to become open to the idea of legalizing the substance.

Support for making the use of marijuana legal. / Gallup Politics Poll

Our government which was created “for the people and by the people”, over the years has persecuted and incarcerated many individuals for the growing, selling, smoking and the buying of cannabis for years. And as the masses become more and more accepting of the plant, why does the government still crack its imaginary whip on millions of Americans? The use of marijuana has yet to cause a single death of an individual unlike its other illegal counterparts (Methamphetamine, Cocaine, Heroin,etc.) that it is categorized with. When it comes to medicinal purposes the Scripps Research Institute found that a chemical found in marijuana delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) can prevent the growth of enzymes that accelerate the formation of Alzheimers. Also for the millions of Americans that are dealing with cancer, the drug has been approved by the FDA and American Cancer Society as playing an active role in many cancer patients treatment.

   With America being the number one country that imprisons more people than any other country in the world why is weed still an issue when there are many other crimes (far worst) being committed. Having officers arrest individuals for carrying drug paraphernalia is a waste of tax payers money, and absurd. Out of many of these arrests, one third of them  are nonviolent drug offenses, 47 percent of which involve marijuana. Why are tax payers forking out cash to house individuals who decided to light up a dubie? A dubie that would not even cost them their life. By legalizing marijuana, drug cartels will lose a huge number of clientele. Why not sale it her LEGALLY and and put some of the drug lords south of the border out of business. Help stop some of the violence near and on the border. But as many point out “what about the other drugs cartels import?” well if we can stop one drug from being illegally imported, that is one less problem America has to deal with.

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9 Responses to To Smoke or Not To Smoke…That is the Question?

  1. pjshield says:

    This is an interesting article and well researched but you lost me at the end. Most lawmakers and officers will agree that legalizing marijuana will not stop the violence made by the cartels. In fact, most of them think that it will only escalate the violence from where it already is. Legalizing marijuana here in America will only allow the cartel to operate a bigger market in the states. If this blog is correct and it does stop the cartels from selling in America, the cartels will need to make up that flow of money in other ways. That could mean boosting up other drugs sales or other illegal activities. The reason the federal government is not willing to legalize marijuana is because the government is not sure how the cartels will react and until that problem is understood or stopped, it will continue to be illegal. The states can legalize it as much as they want but it is still a controlled substance in those legal states and illegal according to federal law.

    • eifiguer says:

      In response to your claim that most lawmakers think that the violence will escalate if the drug were legalized, do you think that as well? What about nicotine cigarettes and alcohol and how these two addictive substances a player to the violence that we see in today’s society? Although there is underage consumption of both products there is a lot less violence surrounding the actual obtainment of the substance. I think that even though the medical usage for marijuana could be extracted into a pill form, there is a reason for people who want to use it as recreational to do so. This is especially because we do have other substances such as alcohol that does cause greater harm to the community, such as DUI cases and domestic violence and other violent offenses. I would say that compared to alcohol marijuana seems to be the lesser of evils, yet after the age of 21 we are legally able to drink in the states. I don’t find a problem in legalizing marijuana while there are far worse that law enforcement should be looking at.

      • eifiguer says:

        To clarify, I am speaking to violence in the United States, Unless Mexico decides to also legalize marijuana it is difficult to speculate on the outcome of their war on drugs. Recently capturing Joaquin, or “el Chapo” Guzman speculated the drop of criminal activities but in fact, other surrounding cartels have wagged war on one another to claim the drug routes and lands of el Chapo.

  2. nicksalute says:

    This post was very interesting, and presents some good insights on a very controversial issue. When it comes to marijuana, it is difficult to argue against its various beneficial uses. The fact that it can be used positively for medicinal purposes is undoubtedly a strong argument. Not only could the legalization of the seemingly harmless plant assist in the medical field, but the possibility of it boosting the American economy is relevant as well. If our government were to legalize it, and then tax it at exceedingly high rates, it could provide a very substantial source of revenue.
    As far as the cartels go, I feel that it is a little too speculative to assume that by legalizing marijuana in the U.S., Mexican cartel violence will be diminished. It is true and obvious that their American-marijuana sales will decrease, but they could simply shift their focus onto importing new drugs at greater volumes.
    Overall, the post was very thought-provoking. Good job.

  3. This was a very good article. As someone who has never partaken in the use of marijana, I will never really understand the draw to it for those with no medical needs. But what I do understand is the fact that it is a growing business that needs to be taxed. Making marijana an legal substance is just common scenes. With the US jails filled with petty drug crimes. It is costing the US takes payers more to keep them in jail, then it is for people in death row. And did I mention if the US made this “cash crop” legal, it can be taxed. Sometimes this system we have in place just doesn’t make any good choices. Well done.

  4. mernasyawish says:

    Very good job in this post. The issue whether Marijuana should be legalized or is one of the most controversial topics we have in today’s society and I think you did a great job summarizing what the opposing viewpoints are on the drug. I think a lot of people such as myself, understand that the use of weed has loads of medical benefits. I really don’t think that is the problem here, I feel that people have an issue more the aspect of the outcome weed has set on people who use it, specifically, teenagers. All you see nowadays is teens saying terms like “stoner” or “pothead” and letting that kind of define who they are in a negative way and how they act towards others. Of course, there are people who don’t face the same outcome of the drug. Again, so many opposing opinions about this topic that seem to have strong arguments on both sides.

  5. mernasyawish says:

    Very good job on this post. The issue whether Marijuana should be legalized or is one of the most controversial topics we have in today’s society and I think you did a great job summarizing what the opposing viewpoints are on the drug. I think a lot of people such as myself, understand that the use of weed has loads of medical benefits. I really don’t think that is the problem here, I feel that people have an issue more the aspect of the outcome weed has set on people who use it, specifically, teenagers. All you see nowadays is teens saying terms like “stoner” or “pothead” and letting that kind of define who they are in a negative way and how they act towards others. Of course, there are people who don’t face the same outcome of the drug. Again, so many opposing opinions about this topic that seem to have strong arguments on both sides.

  6. Very interesting post and a big argument that will continue to be in the news for time to come. I believe that this post makes sense for those that do see harm in the so called ” drug ” but for those who agree with it can look at this and totally see that it has not been a cause of a death after consumption. I am on the fence with this subject due to me wanting to become a police officer in the future and probably going to have to prevent this drug on the streets. Thank you for this post and the statistical points.

  7. vcodrington says:

    This is a highly controversial issue, but also a very reforming one. As you mentioned many of the states have been taking a second look, and many even a second stance on this issue. However, after doing extensive research on this topic previously the only reason marijuana has yet to be legalized is because of the “green”, in this case money. Marijuana charges, and enforcement supply too much revenue too big “players” in today’s economy. To name a few: Law Enforcement, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Private Prison Corporations. These players all have an enormous amount of interest invested whether it be due to the fact that corporations may think marijuana is a cheaper alternative than most pharmaceutical medicine, or that it will lessen the amount of beds filled in a privately-operated prison. Money is always the issue, and I completely agree with your stance. Great post!

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